SOLD OUT! WTTS and Forty5 Present

Ben Folds

What Matters Most Tour with Tall Heights
  • Sat Jun 24, 2023
  • 5:00 PM / Show: 7:00 PM
$24.75 to $50.00 Sale Ended

Ben Folds with special guest Tall Heights at Rock the Ruins at Holliday Park in Indianapolis on Saturday, June 24, 2023!

“More than anything, I wanted to make an album that was generous, that was useful,” says Ben Folds. “I want you to finish this record with something you didn’t have when you started.”

Indeed, Folds’ masterful new collection, What Matters Most, isn’t so much a statement as it is an offering, an open hand reaching out to all those wounded and bewildered by a world that seems to make less and less sense every day. Recorded in East Nashville with co-producer Joe Pisapia, the album marks Folds’ first new studio release in eight years, and it’s a bold, timely, cinematic work, one that examines the tragic and the absurd in equal measure as it reckons with hope and despair, gratitude and loss, identity, and perspective. The songs are bittersweet here, hilarious at times, but often laced with a quiet sense of longing and dread: a text message goes unanswered; an old classmate descends into the dark depths of internet conspiracies; a relationship unravels in the middle of a lake. And yet, taken as a whole, the result is an undeniably joyful record that refuses to succumb to the weight of the world around it, an ecstatic reminder of all the beauty and promise hiding in plain sight for anyone willing (and present enough) to recognize their moments as they arrive.

“There’s a lifetime of craft and experience all focused into this one record,” Folds reflects. “Sonically, lyrically, emotionally, I don’t think it’s an album I could have made at any other point in my career.”

Born and raised in North Carolina, Folds first rose to fame in the mid-’90s with Ben Folds Five, whose acerbic, genre-bending take on piano pop helped define an entire era of alternative rock. After scoring multiple hit singles and a gold record with the band, Folds launched his solo career in 2001, releasing a series of similarly acclaimed albums that would firmly establish him as one of the most ambitious and versatile songwriters of his generation. In 2010, Folds teamed up with celebrated author Nick Hornby on a collaborative record titled Lonely Avenue; in 2014, he composed his first piano concerto; in 2015, he recorded an album with the classical ensemble yMusic; in 2017, he became the artistic advisor to the National Symphony Orchestra at the Kennedy Center, where he began curating a series of performances marrying contemporary artists with symphonic orchestration; in 2019, he released his New York Times best-selling memoir, A Dream About Lightning Bugs; and in 2021, he launched the Lightning Bugs podcast, an interview series on creativity and process with guests as diverse as Jon Batiste, Sara Bareilles, Bob Saget, and Rainn Wilson. As if that wasn’t enough to keep him busy, Folds also revealed himself to be a prolific photographer with gallery shows in the US and Europe, appeared onscreen in films and television (most recently playing himself in three episodes of the hit Amazon Prime series The Wilds), composed music for a 25-minute stage adaptation of Mo Willem’s Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs (which premiered at the Kennedy Center), and serves on the boards of the Arts Action Fund, the Nashville Symphony and Planet Word, a new immersive museum in Washington, DC, dedicated to celebrating the power of language.

“It can be difficult jumping back and forth from one discipline to another,” says Folds, “but you learn so much from moving between worlds and collaborating with so many different kinds of artists. I performed some of the songs on this record with the National Symphony Orchestra before I finished recording them for the album, and that context gave me so much insight into how I wanted to handle them in the studio.”

Working with friends Rob Moose, Ross Garren and Tall Heights, and with Dodie and Ruby Amanfu lending vocal harmonies, Folds tackled the recording process with an orchestrator’s ear, carefully arranging each instrumental element in relief to his electrifying, insistent vocal melodies. Such detailed deliberation didn’t supplant improvisation or spontaneity in the room, but rather it focused the music first and foremost on supporting the lyrics, which stand front and center even in the record’s most sonically wild and unexpected moments.

 

“One thing I’ve taken from all of my orchestral work is that music feels best to me when it’s an event,” says Folds. “It’s easy to lose sight of that now that you can digitally edit the life and reality out of everything, but I’m trying to take the audience on a ride with me, and a big part of that requires grounding everything in the spirit of storytelling and live performance.”

That marriage of sophisticated craftsmanship and raw energy is clear from the top of the album, which opens with the defiantly optimistic “But Wait, There’s More.” “Do you still believe in the good of humankind? / I do I do I do I do I do,” Folds sings over a minimalist keyboard sequence that lands somewhere between Steve Reich and Laurie Anderson before giving way to lush horns and propulsive drums. Like much of the album, the song revels in unpredictability, zigging when you expect it to zag as it offers an empathetic acknowledgement of just how exhausting it is to live perpetually perched on the edge. “Not sure that we can take too much more,” Folds confesses in the track’s final seconds. “Pray that there’s a bottom somewhere in sight / Brothers and sisters hold tight.”

“The song suddenly gets a little more serious at the end,” Folds reflects, “and I think that’s my way of kind of ushering everyone into this journey that’s about to begin.”

From there, Folds wields humor and pathos with surgical precision as he walks a delicate tightrope between the ridiculous and the mundane. The playful “Exhausting Lover” spins a surreal caricature of rock and roll debauchery over an utterly addictive groove, while the melancholic “Clouds With Ellipses” ruminates on the distinctly modern rhythms and anxieties that come with sharing our most intimate, vulnerable selves via text, and the spare “Kristine From the 7th Grade” watches an acquaintance retreat into their own reality of political misinformation and culture war nonsense.

“I’ve seen so many people who’ve been torn apart from their friends and families due to all sorts of agitating things in the media and on Facebook,” says Folds, who wrote much of the album in Australia, where he spends part of each year. “I wanted the song to acknowledge the sadness of that.”

Folds ultimately isn’t interested in simply lamenting the flaws of our times, but rather in finding ways to still connect to the magic and wonder of being alive no matter what the world may throw at us. The dreamy “Back To Anonymous” embraces the unexpected freedom of a world in which everyone is masked; the off-kilter pop of “Winslow Gardens” loses track of the passing time while isolating with a loved one; the aching title track “What Matters Most” finds new perspective in the face of tragic loss. By the time we arrive at radiant closer “Moments,” it’s clear that transcendence is always within reach, no matter how unlikely it may seem.

“I come from the vinyl era, and this perhaps more than any record I’ve made is a true album,” says Folds. “There’s a very specific sequence and arc to each side, all building up to this almost surreal positive finale, and that structure was really important to me.”

In the album’s opening moments, “But Wait, There’s More” comes off as a rather grimly sardonic tease. (We live in an age of overstimulation, overconsumption, and overwhelming self-absorption. Just how much more can we take?) But by the album’s end, the line feels more like a mantra of hope and perseverance, a reminder that there’s more to this life than meets the eye, more to celebrate, more to love, more to be grateful for. It’s hard to imagine a more generous offering than that.

Tall Heights
 
The third full-length from Tall Heights, Juniors emerged from a period of profound turmoil and revelation for the Massachusetts duo. In the span of five months, Paul Wright and Tim Harrington experienced a convergence of events that included major health and substance-abuse crises among their closest loved ones, saying goodbye to Harrington’s grandfather and to a beloved grandfather figure for Wright, and — in far happier, yet still intense news — the announcement that each of their wives was expecting. Compounded by a series of shake-ups in their professional life, that upheaval coincided with the start of the pandemic. Rather than succumbing to the tremendous pressure of that point in time, Tall Heights chose to confront the chaos by creating within it. The result: an album that precisely channels the pain, uncertainty, and unbridled joy of its inception.
 
As they set to work on Juniors, Harrington and Wright discovered an unexpected outcome of the loss that they’d endured: a shift in mindset that enabled them to embrace a boundless curiosity and exploratory spirit even more powerful than when they first formed Tall Heights (an endeavor that began when Harrington, on guitar, and Wright, on cello, used to busk on the streets of Boston back in the late 2000s). In a nod to the wide-eyed perspective that arose from the album’s creation, the duo chose a title evocative of youthful wonder. “After everything we went through, we came to a place of understanding that we have no control, that each new day is an adventure we need to approach with beginner’s eyes,” says Harrington. Wright adds: “Through all the discomfort, we took it as our mission to stay humble and hungry, to know that everything will change and to be prepared to find something of real value in that — and to find ourselves in it, too.”
 
The follow-up to 2018’s Pretty Colors For Your Actions, Juniors came to life at “The Tall House” — the Northeastern Massachusetts home where Wright and Harrington lived together for six years with their wives, pets, and Harrington’s firstborn son, eventually moving out in August 2020. In a departure from the elaborate production process that yielded its predecessor, the two musicians wrote and recorded most of Juniors in isolation, holing up on the third floor of the household they liken to a joyfully anarchic artist commune. “It all happened in this tiny, hectic, beautiful space where our wives were also working from home, both pregnant, and there’s a dog and a cat that hated each other, and then Tim’s toddler who’d just started walking would come barging in and start dancing mid-take, joining in a song with us,” Wright recalls. Despite the nonstop disruption, Tall Heights soon found their way to a shapeshifting sound that illuminates their singularity like never before. “Because we were cut loose and isolated within this space and time, we ended up capturing something incredibly and uniquely us in the new sound we created,” Harrington points out.
 
In putting the finishing touches on Juniors, Tall Heights headed to Omaha and worked with producers Mike Mogis (Paul McCartney, Phoebe Bridgers, Bright Eyes) and Oliver Hill, who helped refine and enrich the backdrop of their emotionally raw songwriting. On the opening track “Keeps Me Light,” the band muses on the ineffable comfort and safety of true connection, intensifying the track’s radiant mood with the luminous vocals of a Berklee College of Music a cappella group called Upper Structure. Revealing the complexity of Juniors, Tall Heights then drift into the wistful reverie of “Locked Out,” a song inspired by Wright’s struggle to help his wife through a severe bout of anxiety. “Paul and I each wrote the lyrics to ‘Locked Out,’ which I think points back to how intertwined our lives have become,” says Harrington. “It’s so unlikely that I could have felt his pain as hard as I did — but because I was living it too in that house, what’s fiercely personal to Paul became fiercely personal to me.”
 
The most commanding track on Juniors, “Hear It Again” took shape as Tall Heights messed around with an assortment of synthesizers they’d borrowed from their friend and tourmate Ben Folds, arriving at a tender rumination on home and belonging. “We’ve spent so much of our time living on the road, and that song is our way of asking, ‘What if that’s the place where we feel the most safety and consistency and stability?'” says Harrington. In a particularly poignant turn, “The Mountain” reflects on the losses that Harrington and Wright recently suffered, transforming that heartache into a moment of healing. “A friend had texted us a photo of his grandfather on the day before he died: he was sitting in a hospital bed looking out the window at the mountains, and the sun was shining on his face,” says Wright. “That song came from thinking about our friend’s grandmother saying goodbye to his grandfather and sending him off on his journey, but in a way it also speaks to how there’s been so much collective loss over the past year.” Meanwhile, on “Raindrop,” Tall Heights offer up a meditation on emotional responsibility. “Sometimes a relationship can get intense in the wrong place and time,” says Harrington. “So, in the end, it’s a song about choosing which relationships deserve your all, and when to let things go and move on with your life.”
 
Looking back on the tumultuous year that gave rise to their latest album, Harrington and Wright note that they’ve adopted the Juniors outlook as something of a spiritual ethos: a realization that every new endeavor — no matter how familiar — will undoubtedly present new challenges and extraordinary surprise, ultimately reminding them that they are still but juniors. “I feel ready to view each next chapter of Tall Heights as another round of Juniors,” says Harrington. “This experience has emboldened us to create in any situation — because when life got very intense, we doubled-down on what we care about the most: creating songs together. And it felt fresh and new in that context.” And although leaving the Tall House proved nothing short of heartbreaking, the duo have found their devoted bond to be stronger than ever. “This record gave us the chance to really understand what we have in each other as weird partners on the great journey of self-exploration,” says Wright. “We know now that the Tall House can be a state of mind, not just a place of refuge. So while chaos continues, we’re able to fully see the beauty that can come from it.”

 

‍Rock the Ruins Concert Series

Rock the Ruins is a summer concert series hosted by The Vogue at Holliday Park, an enchanting 95-year old park nestled in a gently wooded neighborhood just six miles north of downtown Indianapolis. Perfect for experiencing live music, catching up with neighbors and friends, and connecting with nature, a Rock the Ruins concert is the ideal spot to spend a summer evening. We encourage our all-ages guests to bring chairs/blankets for all Rock the Ruins shows as seating will not be provided for general admission guests. No outside coolers or alcoholic beverages will be permitted in the park as guests will be encouraged to take advantage of a variety of local and artisan vendors selling food and beverages (alcoholic and non-alcoholic). Guests must present a valid ID (and be 21+) to purchase alcoholic beverages while on-site for any Rock the Ruins event at Holliday Park.

B‍EN FOLDS WITH SPECIAL GUEST TALL HEIGHTS
SATURDAY, JUNE 24, 2023
ROCK THE RUINS AT HOLLIDAY PARK
INDIANAPOLIS, IN
TICKETS AT ROCKTHERUINS.COM

PLEASE NOTE:

‍All tickets are non-transferrable and non-refundable. This event is rain or shine. This event is General Admission, and seating is not provided. Guests are encouraged to bring their own chairs. For a full list of permitted and prohibited items, parking and transportation details, information on ADA seating, and answers to other frequently asked questions, visit the FAQ page.